A Wander book list

Aside from the mandatory “Leaves of Grass” by Walt Whitman and “The Wander Society” by Keri Smith, what else is a wandering soul to read? Here is a brief suggested reading list.

Alemagna, Beatrice   On a Magical Do-Nothing Day 

Antony, Rachael   The Lonely Planet Guide To Experimental Travel 

Baxter, John  The Most Beautiful Walk in the World: A Pedestrian in Paris

Bonnett, Alastair Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies

Cuff, Marcie Chambers   This Book Was a Tree: Ideas, Adventures, and Inspiration for Rediscovering the Natural World 

Deakin, Roger  Wildwood: A Journey through Trees 

Elkin, Lauren  Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London

Foer, Joshua   Atlas Obscura: An Explorer’s Guide to the World’s Hidden Wonders 

Gooley, Tristan  The Walker’s Guide to Outdoor Clues and Signs

Huth, John Edward  The Lost Art of Finding Our Way

Ilgunas, Ken   Walden on Wheels: On the Open Road from Debt to Freedom 

Macfarlane, Robert  Landmarks

Macleod, Janice   A Paris Year: My Day-to-Day Adventures in the Most Romantic City in the World 

Miyazaki, Yoshifumi  Shinrin Yoku: The Art of Japanese Forest Bathing 

Rives, T.M.   Secret New York – An Unusual Guide. Local Guides by Local People 

Solnit, Rebecca    Wanderlust: A History of Walking 

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Autism and ADD books

Elman, Natalie Madorsky – The Unwritten Rules of Friendship: Simple Strategies to Help Your Child Make Friends 

Grossberg, Blythe – Asperger’s Rules!: How to Make Sense of School and Friends    

Howley, Marie  – Revealing the Hidden Social Code: Social Stories (TM) for People with Autistic Spectrum Disorders 

Kelly, Kate – You Mean I’m Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!  

Kranowitz, Carol Stock – The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder 

Meloy, C.G.  -Life & Spectrum: A Revealing Look at High Functioning Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome 

Moore, Debra  – The Loving Push: How Parents and Professionals Can Help Spectrum Kids Become Successful Adults 

Myles, Brenda Smith  – Asperger Syndrome and Sensory Issues: Practical Solutions for Making Sense of the World 

Pera, Gina   – Is It You, Me, or Adult ADD? Stopping the Roller Coaster When Someone You Love Has Attention Deficit Disorder 

Train, Alan – ADHD: How to Deal with Very Difficult Children  

Tips and tricks for art journaling

Don’t worry about it.  You can’t do it wrong.  Whatever you want to do is correct. This is an excuse to play and express yourself in a new way. Nobody has to see it, so you don’t have to worry about it looking “right”. You don’t have to be an artist to enjoy art journaling.

Remember “A picture is worth a thousand words”?   You can often express yourself in ways you’d never have words for by doodling, scribbling, or splashing paint on the page. 

Cut and paste is a totally legitimate form of expression. I use magazine cut-outs all the time.

This doesn’t have to be an expensive hobby.  Often it is best to start out with a simple inexpensive journal that you don’t especially love.  If it is too precious, you won’t feel free to cut into it or paint on it.

It is good to pick a journal that you enjoy holding and is portable if you are going to sketch away from home.  I like one that has a spiral spine so I can work on just one side at a time.  Good paper matters – you want something that will hold up to what materials you are using.  If you are using wet mediums you’ll want to use thicker paper so it won’t warp.

If you are going to be gluing things into your journal, go ahead and cut out every 5th page before you even start.  This gives the journal room to absorb the extra bulk without making it splay open or breaking the spine.

You can combine scrapbooking, journaling, and sketching.  There are no limits to this art form.  You can glue in concert tickets or menus from a memorable evening.  You can take photos and print them out and glue them in. 

If sketching people who are moving (like musicians or workers), watch them for about 5 minutes.  They will have a ‘default” position they will return to. Roughly sketch that position.  When they move out, sketch what is around them.  When they return, add more to that part.

Most people won’t even realize you are sketching them because they are so distracted by what they are doing.  But try to be polite and discrete about it anyway.  People are best to sketch when they are being themselves. 

Sketching isn’t about making a photograph. You’ll need to leave some things out. The goal is to capture an impression – not to make a perfect replica of what was there.

Leave space in your sketch to write in notes.  Things I like to include – day, time, how long the sketch took, location, what was going on (why was I there – was there a special event?) and weather conditions if I am outside.  Consider using an interesting ink color.

There are many different materials to sketch with.  I like using watercolor pencils.  They are portable and easy to work with in the field. I add water using a small brush later.

“Invisible house series” book list

Beecroft, Julian  Lost Cities: Beauty in Desolation

Bonnett, Alastair  Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies

cummings, e e    The poem titled [i carry your heart with me(i carry it in]      I especially like this poem as sung by Michael Hedges on his album “Taproot”

Goldsworthy, Andy   Andy Goldsworthy: A Collaboration with Nature   Anything by Andy Goldsworthy speaks to the nature of impermanence. This Scottish artist creates his work with whatever he finds on his walks in nature. He photographs them, and then they return to their natural state.

Harmon, Katharine You Are Here: Personal Geographies and Other Maps of the Imagination

Houston, Jeanne Wakatsuki Farewell to Manzanar: A True Story of Japanese American Experience During and After the World War II Internment

Hughes, T. John Apparitions: Architecture That Has Disappeared From Our Cities This book overlaps “then” with “now”, showing ghost outlines of buildings that were demolished to make way for new ones.

Jones, Diana Wynne   Howl’s Moving Castle   This is part of a trilogy. This has also been made into a movie by the famous Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki. It features a house that walks around.

Miéville, China   The City & the City  An intriguing speculative fiction story of two cities that exist in the same physical space but have entirely different cultures, languages, and habits.

Rives, T.M.         Secret New York – An Unusual Guide. Local Guides by Local People This has some nice examples of pocket parks and other overlooked negative spaces.

An eclectic list of healing books.

Castaneda, Carlos. The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge (Book one in a series)

Hammerschlag, Carl. Healing Ceremonies: Creating Personal Ritual for Spiritual, Emotional, Physical, and Mental Health

Kolk, Bessel A. van der. The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma

McLeod, Adam. Dreamhealer: His Name Is Adam

Mindell, Arnold. The Shaman’s Body: A New Shamanism for Transforming Health, Relationships, and the Community

Myss, Caroline. Anatomy of the Spirit: The Seven Stages of Power and Healing

Olitzky, Kerry M. Jewish Paths Toward Healing and Wholeness: A Personal Guide to Dealing with Suffering

Tolle, Eckhart. The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment

Spiritual fiction

A short list of fantasy / science fiction / speculative fiction where faith is a major element.

Bowker, Richard – Forbidden Sanctuary
Cogswell, Theodore – Spock, Messiah!
Del Rey, Lester – The Eleventh Commandment
Easton, M. Coleman – Iskiir
Elgin, Suzette Haden – Star Anchored, Star Angered
Farmer, Philip Jose – The Stone God Awakens
Foster, Alan Dean – Cyber Way
Grabien, Deborah – Plainsong
Kemelman, Harry – Friday the Rabbi Slept Late
L’Engle, Madeleine – The Wrinkle in Time series