In a nutshell

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The squirrel absentmindedly chewed into the acorn. It was bitter, a little soft. She thought of herself as a bit of a gourmand when it came to acorns. She learned in her eight autumns exactly when acorns were best, and which ones lasted through a cold winter buried in the ground. She told herself that her memory was impeccable, that every acorn she buried she found.

This was not true, of course. It was how the Creator had made squirrels. If they remembered all the acorns, no new trees would take root. The only reason they remembered where some of the nuts was so they could survive to plant again for another season. Squirrels were designed to plant trees – nothing else. This is why their meat wasn’t safe to eat. Sure, in desperation, you could eat a few squirrels, but you had to be careful. Wild ones carried parasites. Hunters learned to take them after the first frost to be safe. Those who weren’t in a survival situation, not driven desperate by lack of food or money to buy it, would kill them, clean them (always examining the liver for signs of disease) and put them in the deep freezer to ensure any parasites were taken care of. But most people didn’t bother with squirrels. Too much work for so little meat. “Tree rats,” they were called, too. That was also a plan of the Creator. Have us not notice them, not even think of them as food, but as vermin. Not bad enough to be exterminated like rats, but enough to make you not have squirrel on the menu very often.

This squirrel had successfully made it enough years to plant all the trees that were necessary. Anything that she did after this was extra. Was this a form of squirrel retirement? Of a the sort. She didn’t know it, of course. She didn’t even know how long she’d been alive. Every day was her birthday in her mind. It was always a special surprise just to wake up, to traipse about the forest. Everything was a joy, because she had nothing to compare it to. Every day was a new day – not better or worse than the one before. She had no family that she knew of – all squirrels were her family. All worked together as the need arose. Sure, there were squabbles now and then, but they never lasted long, much as with people who were stoned. They couldn’t remember anything long enough to be upset about it. Life was easier that way.

This squirrel had a special gift. She was an artist. But just like with planting trees, she was unaware of who she truly was. She didn’t think of herself as a gardener, or an artist, or even a squirrel. She didn’t think of herself at all. Her mind was not filled with thoughts about what she should do next or how to do it. There is no internal monologue, no comparison, no angst. Every moment was the first moment, the only moment.

She finally bit through to the core of the acorn. In one sudden snap she discovered why it was so different from all the others – so dark so bitter, so lightweight. The acorn was hollow, eaten out at least a week before by a tiny worm. She’d not noticed the tiny hole it had left as evidence of its meal, like a tiny breaking and entering. He’d cleaned out the shell of anything valuable, carrying it away in his belly. Then the damp had gotten in and darkened what remained, turning it sour.

She stopped absentmindedly chewing once she reached the void that remained. This moment was new. It needed to be memorialized. It was simply different – not good or bad. While she had hoped for a meal, she got an opportunity to create. She put down the husk and scampered about to find something suitable to place inside. It would be a sign to whoever found it to slow down, to notice, to pay attention. She found the tender tip of an evergreen and bit it off. It took a little effort to get it inside the nut bowl. Then she placed another tiny leaf. Her artwork was done, her masterpiece of the day. She carefully placed it on a stone to the side of the path. It wouldn’t do to have it stepped on and crushed.

Unintentionally she had placed it at a crossroads in the garden. This was a place where the stepping-stones merged to  a center point – a larger stone telling the visitor to stop. In the language of this garden it was as effective as a red traffic sign.

Three days later the visitor found the creation. She’d come to the garden to celebrate her birthday. A special day required a special event, and a trip to this garden on the other side of town was in order.

She was dazzled by her luck. While it was almost December, the Japanese maples and Bradford pears were still wearing their autumn best – all cranberry reds and pumpkin oranges. The starkness of winter had not yet reached this special place.

Her eyes were used to the special beauty of her birth month, with its blue skies as clear and clean as a mountain lake, and the lightning-bright bark of the white birch trees finally able to take center stage now that their leaves had disappeared. No, November’s joys weren’t flashy like those from March through August. Those born in her embrace had softer eyes, attuned to subtle beauty. They had to be, or else all they saw was gray and damp.

She’d been dazzled by the unexpected exuberance of the garden and stopped to catch her breath at the center stone in the garden. It was then that she saw it. Perhaps she had been primed by the tsukubai nearby.

 

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It was filled with rainwater and submerged leaves – an unintentional autumn vignette. This tiny acorn husk, propped on a nearby accent stone, resembled it in miniature, a perfect complement to this particular Japanese garden, compact as it was.

There is something distinctive about Japanese gardens – everything is miniaturized, reduced down to the bare essence of what was needed to convey the required feelings of stillness and serenity. Their beauty lay in their carefully crafted design – just enough and not too much.

She stooped down to examine this tiny surprise and discovered the treasures within. What a marvel! In that moment she achieved satori. Perfection in a nutshell. There was no need to go through with any of her other birthday plans. This tiny unintentional gift was enough to keep her happy for the upcoming year. If it had been presented to her, it would not have been the same. An afterthought, an accidental surprise, a pause on the way to somewhere else – it was enough and everything at the same time.

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Birthday sketching at Cheekwood

In the Japanese Garden at Cheekwood. 62 degrees, cloudy, around 3 pm. A Thursday, so almost no visitors.

The entrance gate.

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In progress –

This wasn’t enough. I wanted to sketch the stone lantern. There is a memorial bench nearby. Generally, in a Japanese Garden, a bench is placed to remind you to stop here. There is a view that you need to see.
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This is a Kasuga-style lantern. Stone lanterns, “ishidoro”, before use in the tea gardens, were used along the approaches to or within the grounds of temples and shrines.

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A scan of this, with a leaf of a Japanese maple taken from brunch at First Watch earlier. The same colors were in this garden. The scan has made this much darker.

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This is the main focus of the garden. There is a large covered area to view it from. The rails cut into the view.
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and to the left
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In progress –

There were very few people in the garden today.  It was a Thursday and very overcast.  However, this is perfect for taking photographs or sketching.  Another lady came by and sat in the covered area – also to sketch.  We acknowledged each other’s presence but stayed respectfully silent.  Even when my husband came to sit next to me, we whispered.  It is a sacred place.

To my eyes, there appeared to be a cherry tree in bloom to the far left.  That normally happens in April.  Magic.

A scan of this –

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I may add more color to this later, using the photos I’ve taken for reference.

Because the garden was so “busy” with color and plantings, I decided to sketch it quickly with just dark grey.  I like how it looks like Japanese calligraphy – that words are pictures, and pictures are words.

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The bottom of the sketch is a quick view inside the tatami room at the Japanese restaurant where we went for supper. Normally for a large group – you can get it if there is just a couple of you if you ask and nobody else has reserved it.

Here are quick sketches of our food and a corner of the room with one of the legless chairs. These are dry – no water added.

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The colors are better in real life – but so is everything, after all.

 

Tuesday at the cemetery

11/14/17 Tuesday morning before work.  9:45 to 10:40 am.  50 degrees, sunny.  Calvary Cemetery.  More leaves on the ground than on the trees.

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Pictures taken on site –

The mausoleum is at the center of the first picture and sketch.  I walked to it and sketched it as well.  Basic colors and shapes done on site, more color added at home from the reference pictures.

The Hope rock

I have been a member of 615 Rocks for a few months, but have realized that I’m not very good at painting rocks.  There is so little space on the rocks, and I’m not sure how to work with the uneven surface.  I have a lot of different crafts I do so I’m unwilling to master another one.  I’m becoming too scattered.  I need to focus on one thing.

But I had this little pile of rocks I needed to do something with.  So I spray painted them copper and wrote inspiring words on them.

I took these three rocks on my wanders on Friday, 11/17/17

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I left the “Hope” one at the CVS in Hermitage.

It was found by Rachel Michelle, who then took it to the CVS near Harding Place.  She said “I found it the day I turned in my two weeks notice to begin a new better job!!! It was the sign I needed!”

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Someone else took it to Vanderbilt hospital, where it was found by Jess Robertson, who said “Couldn’t have found this rock at a better time or place! I think I’ll hang on to it, we can definitely use a little “HOPE” right now!… Found it as I sit with my husband recovering from heart surgery…much needed!…I plan to rehide it once he’s discharged…prayerfully it provides the same hope for someone else’s family!”

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How nice to know that one little rock  – with nothing more than a simple word, can inspire so many people.  It is wonderful to see how it is touching people’s lives.

 

Sketch from the grave of Oliver A. Bland

Calvary Cemetery, 12:45 pm, 58 degrees, sunny, Friday 11/17/17.



Original sketch on site.  The quote is from a different grave  – a classic message to the visitor.

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More color added, water added.  This is a scan, so the colors are brighter than they really are.

Oliver Bland
Sketch was done while sitting on the edge of the ledger of Oliver A. Bland – 1854 + 1940.  All that space on the marker and there is just his name and birth/death years. There is room for plenty more information.  But, to be honest, in 50 years it will have worn away or gotten covered in lichen.


More views from that area.

 

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Info from Find A Grave website –

“Oliver Arthur Bland was born on October 18, 1854 in Davidson County, Tennessee, the son of Joseph Bland (ca 1832- ) and his wife Henrietta (Hughes) Bland (ca 1837- ).

He was married 1st on September 21, 1879 in Sumner County to Minerva L Hutchins (c Sep 1862- ). He was married 2nd to the much younger Sydney Crawford, who was born about 1905. Oliver had no known children.

A retired banker and lumberman living at 1903 Cedar Lane, Nashville, he was 86 years old and married when he died at home of cancer of the tongue on October 27, 1940. Burial was the next day in Calvary Cemetery, Nashville.

Most of the above is from his Death Certificate, with Sydney Crawford Bland of 1903 Cedar Lane as the informant.”

Weekly sketch #5 Stone Hall from the front steps

Three to 4 pm, overcast, 75 degrees. Friday, 11/3/17.  Sitting on the front porch of Stone Hall, pretending this is my normal view out of my house.  Grateful this is a public park that I can go to, and that very few others know about.

My view

Sketch as completed on site


Sketch after adding more color at home and adding water.