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Buyer beware

I have recently learned about a day camp for children with special needs.  I am very concerned about it because the parents who might send their children to this might think that it was safe.  I think that is the furthest from the truth.

Yvonne Perry, creator of the “We are 1 in Spirit” blog and self-published author of books about being a host to “walk-in” entities, is holding a “Special Needs Children’s Day Camp” Monday July 10 through Wednesday July 12.

It is being held at a retreat center that she bought. She won’t even give out the address until you pay for the day camp.

There is no oversight or supervision to this.  There is no agency that is sponsoring this, no system of checks and balances.

Would you trust your child, especially one with special needs, to this person? Look into her eyes.  What do they tell you about her?

yvonne

She talks openly about being a host to “walk-in” entities.   She says that she has been taken over by multiple different personalities and spirits.  In the medical world, this is called “multiple personality disorder”.  In the spiritual world, this is called “possession”.

Either way, I wouldn’t think this is a person who should be left alone with children who would have a lower level of ability to communicate their needs.  Special-needs children are even more vulnerable that other children.

From the ad for it –

–“Nurturing the Special Needs Child” is a day camp for children K-5 through 4th grade, facilitated by Tiffany Holt and Yvonne Perry. Intuitive and special needs children are invited to participate in this program near Ashland City, Tennessee. This “hands-on” classroom is a 3-day workshop (Monday through Wednesday) designed for understanding the imaginative child and enhancing his or her self-esteem.”

 

So how much for all of this? For three days (8 am to 5 pm) of leaving your child alone with someone who is not trained, not licensed, not an authority in anything at all … $150.

The other host is Tiffany Holt, who according to the ad “is a certified K-8 teacher and Master level Reiki teacher. She is a Special Educational Assistant at Kenrose Elementary in Brentwood, Tennessee.”

But is this true?  All we have to go on is the words in the ad.

Wisely, the person with no real qualifications is at the end of the ad –

“Yvonne Perry is a former pre-school music teacher, a sound healing therapist, and the owner of Sweet Home Retreat Center. She is the author of many books, including “The Sid Series ~ A Collection of Holistic Stories for Children”, which was inspired by her grandson (now 16 years old) who was in touch with the spirit world at an early age. She loves gardening, singing, being in nature, playing with kids, and creating beauty and harmony in everything she touches.”

as well as this …

“Yvonne Perry is a metaphysical author, light language practitioner, workshop facilitator, and shaman-ka who helps people shift into their most loving authentic selves. She does this through healing sound therapy and her books, prayers, seminars, coaching, and spiritual services.”

What is a “shaman-ka”?  She made this up.  Along with everything else.  “Sham” is more like it.

Be sure to read between the lines and notice that she charges people to “heal” them with her “light-language” (random non-language mutterings that she describes as speaking in tongues) as well as her “sound therapy” (singing random notes at people).

She is unlicensed, untrained, and unsupervised.  She has no certification in anything she does.  And yet she thinks that she can charge people for her “talents”.

Would you hire an electrician to rewire your house without making sure he was trained and licensed first?  No.

Would you allow a person to teach (or even babysit) your child if they were not certified to do so? No.

Then why would anyone pay this woman to “heal” them – or worse, leave their children alone with them?

I said nothing when she began her “healing” services over a year ago. Adults have to make their own decisions about what they do with their lives.  But I have to speak up when she starts thinking it is OK to say she is qualified to teach children – and special-needs children (who are more vulnerable).

She has written many books, and people might think that this means she has been reviewed by other experts in the field.  Most authors submit their work to a publishing company who checks out their work to see if it is accurate before they will publish it.  However, she skipped that step and self-publishes.  Therefore, she has no oversight.

Full disclosure – I wrote something for her that became part of her “light language” book.  This was before she decided to charge people for her services.  I am in agreement that people need to re-connect with the Holy Spirit in whatever way possible, but I disagree with charging money for it.

 

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