Park made out of negative space

There is a small public park off the square in Lewisburg, TN that was constructed out of negative space. There used to be a building there. I don’t know the history of what was there, and why it was destroyed. Usually businesses go out of business and then someone buys the building and starts another business. Perhaps there was a fire?

Whatever the reason, it is a very interesting use of space to make a public park in between buildings, in a place where most people would see it as wasted space or a place to rebuild. It is nice that this is open to the public for free, any time.

Here is a view of it before you enter.
1

Here is one from the side.
2

Getting closer.
5

From the side, with an emphasis on the immense wall or gate that frames the park.
3

This is who made the entrance.
19

There are inspirational signs around the park. I wonder how they decided upon which quotes would be included?
6
7
8
9
10

A view of one of the benches, showing the small yard.
4

There is brickwork on the ground towards the back, but I was fascinated by the crumbled bit.
11

A wall is stair-stepped brick.
12

The wall has a lot of interesting nooks and crannies.
16

There is a long wooden structure, perhaps a shed, in the back. It is perhaps four feet deep, and maybe seven feet high.
13

It has a door to the far right.
14

I wonder who has the key to this lock, and what is inside?
15

A view of one of the support posts.
17

The commemorative sign.
18

I do wonder, since it is a public park, if they thought about the fact that not everybody celebrates Christmas? Do they have decorations for other religious holidays?

Traveling house

This is on the corner of a Presbyterian church’s lot, like an afterthought. The style doesn’t match anything around it. It is for rent, but looks like it has been abandoned for quite a while. It reminds me of the stories in Speculative Fiction that talk about a traveling house – one that isn’t in the same spot for very long. Sometimes they are magic shops.

1

This would make an interesting studio / workshop / place to host retreats.

It is long and narrow.
2

Note the awning over the door, and the second floor door on the building next to it.
3

Putting the camera to the front door window, a view inside. What interesting arches! I wonder what this was. Is that a small window for a receptionist? It seems far bigger on the inside than it appears to be outside.
4

Another angle.
5

A view through the front window. An office, and a small kitchen with coffee-themed knick-knacks.
6

Showing the interesting detail (Spanish?) and how close it is to the church. I feel this was built long after the church was. Did they need extra money? Was it a rectory? Why does it not match the building style then? If it is for rent, does this mean it is a private building? There is a sign for a shingle outside.
7

The back door. My back is up against the church to take this shot. There is a small (foot-wide) moat/ditch you have to step over to get to this door, with a large drain to the right. I’d want a bridge.
8

Looking up from the back door, a sign of a chimney. It is not visible from the front or side. It is for an unusual internal fireplace.
9

The side furthest from the church, in a small alley. Interesting awning and opaque glass on this side.
10

This is a view of the church.
11

These are pictures of the church wall nearest the building. It is made of two different kinds of brick – Old and New. So – is the Old a façade? Is the New a rebuild? The Old is what faces the street, and matches the rest of the church. This part of the building appears to have been constructed after the church was built.

brick detail

brick 2