Home » Encouragement » “I’m sorry” – on forgiveness.

“I’m sorry” – on forgiveness.

There is a difference in saying

“I’m sorry.”
or

“I’d like to apologize for…”
or

“I’m sorry that you felt hurt when I….”

They reflect different degrees of admitting responsibility. They reflect different degrees of accepting how the other person has been hurt by your actions.

There is the true sincere apology statement, and then there is the one where the person understands the social obligation of at least acting sorry. One is real, the other is fake. Don’t be mislead. Even saying “I’d like to apologize for” doesn’t mean anything. The person would like to apologize, but isn’t actually doing so.

And worse, saying sorry doesn’t really even mean anything. If you hammer nails into a tree, and then pull them out, there are still holes there.

Expecting the victim to forgive can actually revictimize her. It puts the burden on her, instead of the abuser. It minimizes her feelings. It glosses over the reality of her pain and loss.

If there has been no apology, no restitution, then there is no closure or healing. Even if there has been an apology or restitution, then is no guarantee that closure or healing has taken place. Once a person has been harmed by another person, sometimes saying “sorry” won’t fix it, and the damage is permanent, especially if the offender has a habit of repeatedly hurting people.

It isn’t fair to the victim to expect her to forgive at all.

Sure, Buddha says that holding on to anger is like drinking poison and hoping the other person will die. Sometimes you have to forgive so you can go on with your life. But forgiveness comes when it comes, and no sooner.

Saying “Aren’t you over that by now?” isn’t kind, or helpful.

Saying “But have you forgiven him in your heart?” makes no sense. What about the liver? Is it OK to still hold some resentment there?

It is the same as getting frustrated with someone who is grieving. Grief takes time, and there isn’t a fixed amount. It takes as long as it takes.

I think people are nervous around grief, or unforgiveness, or anger, because it frightens them. They want to rush right ahead to the happy bit, where all is good and everybody is loving and kind. That Hollywood ending isn’t real. That’s why it is in the movies.

Movies don’t show reality. Sadly, a lot of us have used movies as our role models. This is why a lot of us are in pain. A lot. Our reality never matches up to that reality, and we feel like we are doing something wrong.

Working through feelings is a long process, and our society doesn’t give a lot of help along the way. You have to process your pain, just like how a cow chews its cud. You have to work on it, and wait, and work on it a little more, and wait. You have to transform it into something else. Cows transform grass into energy for their muscles, and then milk.

There is a sort of alchemy here.

Trying to take shortcuts on the process only results in it not really being processed. It will come out half way, unfinished, lumpy. It will come out sideways, if it comes out at all. Sometimes it will get stuck inside, with little jagged bits poking into your soft parts, just causing more pain.

Take as long as you need.

You don’t have to forgive to the extent that you let the abuser hurt you again. You don’t have to forget.

It helps if you can move on, where this rock of grief and pain doesn’t define you, doesn’t limit you, doesn’t keep you stuck in one place.

Work on it. Chew on it. Draw. Paint. Write. Go for a walk. Take your anger with you.

You aren’t running away from your anger and pain and loss, you’re using it as fuel. You’re transforming it into something useful and necessary. It takes a while. It takes as long as it needs to take.

5 thoughts on ““I’m sorry” – on forgiveness.

  1. Pingback: Memory Steeped in Forgiveness – Here’s what I learned about healing and loss in 2013. | SoshiTech - Social Media Technology - Soshitech.com

  2. Reblogged this on Neon Plastic Lotus and commented:
    I’ve expressed and given examples on my views of apology in the past, with my own entries, such as the two Satya blogs, however, here, Betsy Nelon has provided another, very similar, perspective.
    I will admit that Betsy is much more “positive” in her message, which is one of the reasons we look for others to contribute to Neon Plastic Lotus.
    Our only regret is the use of pronouns in the writing. It alienates one sex for another, which is unfortunate, as men can be victims also. –

    Like

    • Indeed, men can be victims too. I’m dismayed by our language’s need for pronouns. I’ve struggled with this myself. Sometimes I alternate pronouns in my writing, but that can be confusing. Thank you for including my post. – Betsy Nelson

      Like

      • You are quite welcome.
        Thank you for submitting. I am sorry for the youtube link. I attempted to embed a video that applies to your post, however I may need to contact wordpress, as my embed is not working.
        Please continue to submit relevant posts to our site, and refer others as well, as long as the posts are relevant to narcissism, spiritual narcissism/spiritual materialism, and the experience of victims of these people.

        We want this page to be a forum where people are able to speak freely of the tortures they underwent with people of this nature.

        Like

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